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Books I Read in 2016 and Books to Read in 2017

page from Well Read Women

2016 was a good year for books. The majority I read, I thoroughly enjoyed. Perhaps it’s because I’m becoming more in tune with the stories and subjects that truly interest me, or perhaps it was just a lucky selection. Either way, I’m hoping for the same in 2017!

I’ve got a great list going for this coming year. And I’ve almost finished my first! Let me know in the comments if you have ones to add.

 

Read in 2016: 

Novels

The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah — Being a huge fan of historical fiction, especially of the the WWII era, this was an automatic addition to my reading list. But it caught me by surprise, as it explored the war almost exclusively from the women-who-were-left-at-home’s point of view. Very poignant and well-written.

The Language of Flowers by Vanessa Diffenbaugh — Having enjoyed working with flowers in arrangements  over the years, learned mostly from my mother, this book struck my fancy. The story revolves around the Victorian meaning of the flowers used by the protagonist in her arrangements. It’s wonderfully woven into the story. Great characters. More thoughts here.

Hannah Coulter by Wendell Berry — My first experience of Berry’s works and I’m yearning for more. I found myself copying passages to return to time and again. The way you are drawn into the deeply personal thoughts and experiences of Hannah was incredible.

Gunnar’s Daughter by Sigrid Undset — It’s been a while since I’ve read the Lavansdatter series, which I love, so I decided to give one of Undset’s others a try. Written in her early years of writing, there is a bit of disjointedness to the story. But that could also be the translation.

The Lake House by Kate Morton — This mystery was wonderfully drawn out and had me yearning for a trip through the London countryside.

The One in a Million Boy by Monica Wood — I started this one not knowing what to expect, but was pleasantly surprised by the characters woven into the story. It explores how a loved one can have a profound impact on lives even after death and how, perhaps, there may be more to someone than meets the eye.

The Little Paris Bookshop by Nina George — Fun, little story, set in one of my favorite cities. This is a light hearted read sure to be enjoyed by bibliophiles and francophiles alike.

A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles — Review here.

The Awakening of Miss Prim by Natalia Sanmartín Fenollera — Many amongst my friends were raving about this. It was an okay read for me.

Everyone Brave is Forgiven by Chris Cleave — I didn’t like this one as much as I thought I would.

Miller’s Valley by Anna Quindlen — One of my least favorite reads of the year, the character’s lacked a depth that I need in a good novel.

 

Short Stories

Memory Wall by Anthony Doerr — After enjoying several others of Doerr’s works, I picked up this collection short stories written earlier. Beautiful writing, but not as captivating for me as his longer books.

 

History

Provence, 1970: M.F.K. Fisher, Julia Child, James Beard, and the Reinvention of American Taste by Luke Barr — Review here.

Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania by Erik Larson — This author is quickly becoming one of my favorites. I’ve always loved historical fiction, but his works are non-fiction that read like fiction. Highly engaging, very intriguing.

 

Parenting/Education

The Artful Parent by Jean Van’t Hul — I’m a huge fan of the Artful Parent blog and this book is a great extension of it. Even our local art museum bases their toddler-based art program–Artful Tot–off of Jean’s philosophy and projects. Especially inspiring for those who aren’t creativity-focused themselves.

Honey for a Child’s Heart by Gladys Hunt — My learning style is founded upon a great library {even if it is one borrowed from the local one} for the children to read along with mom and dad, and, eventually, on their own. This book is a great encouragement and resource for doing just that.

Real Learning: Education in the Heart of the Home by Elizabeth Foss — Managed to grab my mom’s old copy, as this book is out of print, and so happy I did. Elizabeth’s writing through her blog has been an encouragement to me as I embark on homeschooling my children, and her book is equally so. I’ll be returning to it often for further inspiration.

The Read Aloud Handbook by Jim Trelease — The author does an excellent job of explaining why reading aloud to your children is so vital, as well as providing excellent places to start in an expansive booklist. I borrowed this from the library, but need to grab my own, updated copy to have as a resource at home.

The Highly Sensitive Child by Elaine N. Aron — A great help in learning some methods to help children who deal with different types of sensitivities thrive when the world is overwhelming. {Helpful for adults too!}

The Importance of Being Little by Erika Christakis — I really loved this well-researched book on the importance of less didactic lessons and more exploration in early childhood.

 

Self/Home/Family Improvement

Rising Strong by Brené Brown — One of my favorite authors, this book addresses how moments that may kick us down can, ultimately, be excellent tools for growth. Highly recommend. Here is a reflection I wrote on mercy based on my reading of this book.

Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less by Greg McKeown — I rarely do audio books, but that is the only way this was available at our local library. I was glad I did as note taking was much easier this way. A book that will inspire you to take an honest look at what is truly important in your life so you can better give your time to the things that truly are.

Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear by Elizabeth Gilbert — Many creative types were praising Gilbert’s latest work, but I felt it was more praise of her own accomplishments than great encouragement. Just me.

 

Memoirs

Something Other Than God by Jennifer Fulwiler — This book recounts the author’s journey to faith, of finding God when He was the one she was least interested in. If you are a fan of Jennifer’s writing, you’ll enjoy her story.

Four Seasons in Rome: On Twins, Insomnia, and the Biggest Funeral in the History of the World by Anthony Doerr — One of my favorite memoirs of all time. In addition to loving Doerr’s writing, I couldn’t lose with stories of bringing up baby twins as an expat in Italy and his first-hand account as a non-believer experiencing Rome during St. Pope John Paul II’s funeral.

Memoirs of a Happy Failure by Alice von Hildebrand — This was a fascinating read knowing the author from some of her other works. She comes across as a strong, faith-filled woman {which she is}, but this reveals her crisis of confidence due to the pressures from those who doubt her convictions.

Small Victories: Spotting Improbable Moments of Grace by Anne Lamott — This anecdotal collections was humorous, sponanteous, inspiring, irreverent, and sad all at the same time.

When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi — Perhaps my favorite this year, published posthumously, this neurosurgeon begins to write his memoir when he’s faced with his own terminal illness. It will make you dive deeply into your own thoughts of facing death.

 

Politics/Law

Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson — A sobering look at the lack of equity in our justice system, and the work of a man who is desperately trying to change it one person at a time.

 

Communications

Reclaiming Conversation: The Power of Talk in the Digital Age by Sherry Turkle — I appreciated this honest look at how technology can actually be a hindrance to connection and conversation. Some great thoughts here on how we can put checks on ourselves and our children’s internet consumption and better foster connection.

 

Spirituality/Religion

Chiara Corbella Portrillo: A Witness to Joy by Simone Troisi — A difficult, but greatly inspiring read. A little reflection based on my reading of this book.

Divine Mercy for Moms by Michele Faehnle — Review here.

Encountering Truth: Meeting God in the Everyday by Pope Francis — Review here.

Taste and See: Experiencing the Goodness of God with Our Five Senses by Ginny Kubitz Moyer — Written by one of my fellow Blessed is She writers, I loved this wonderful reflection on the blessings in our lives through the five senses.

Present Over Perfect: Leaving Behind Frantic for a Simpler, More Soulful Way of Living by Shauna Niequist — This book was a great reflection for me as I struggle daily with perfectionism. I will be revisiting it throughout this coming year as I try to live out its message.

For the Love: Fighting for Grace in a World of Impossible Standards by Jen Hatmaker — Along the same lines as above, Jen’s message didn’t resonate for me in the same way, but I know many appreciate her writing.

 

knitting and little paris bookshop

 

To Read in 2017: 

Novels

Moon Over Manifest by Clare Vanderpool

Les Miserables: Tome I by Victor Hugo {IN FRENCH!}

The Betrothed by Alessandro Manzoni

The Winthrop Woman by Anya Seton

Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi

Life of Pi by Yann Martel

Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte

The Girl Who Wrote in Silk by Kelli Estes

Winter Solstice by Rosamunde Pilcher

Along the Infinite Sea by Beatriz Williams

Gilead by Marilynne Robinson

The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead

America’s First Daughter by Stephanie Dray

A Fatal Grace by Louise Penny {Inspector Gamache #2}

The Kitchen House by Kathleen Grissom

News of the World by Paulette Jiles

 

History/Memoirs

Eve of a Hundred Midnights by Bill Lascher

The Greater Journey: Americans in Paris by David McCullough

First Women: The Grace and Power of America’s Modern First Ladies by Kate Andersen Brower

One Summer: America, 1927 by Bill Bryson

Hope Heals: A True Story of Overwhelming Loss and an Overcoming Love by Katherine and Jay Wolf

Gift From the Sea by Anne Lindbergh

 

Parenting/Education

Caught Up in a Story by Sarah Clarkson

Educating the Whole Hearted Child by Clay and Sally Clarkson

Teaching From Rest by Sarah Mackenzie

The Lifegiving Home: Creating a Place of Belonging and Becoming by Sally Clarkson

Give Your Child the World by Jamie C. Martin

Whole Brained Child by Daniel J. Siegel {re-read}

Homeschooling Series by Charlotte Mason {Volume I here.}

 

Self/Home/Family Improvement

Quiet by Susan Cain {re-read}

Open Heart, Open Home by Karen Mains

 

Spirituality/Theology

The Broken Way by Ann Voskamp

Vibrant Paradoxes: The Both/And of Catholicism by Robert Barron

In the Midst of Chaos: Caring for Children as a Spiritual Practice by Bonnie J. Miller-McLemore

Who Does He Say You Are? : Women Transformed by Christ in the Gospels by Colleen C. Mitchell

Interior Freedom by Jacques Philippe

 

Philosophy

The Way of Beauty by David Clayton

 

Social Sciences

Walkable City by Jeff Speck

Animal, Vegetable, Miracle by Barbara Kingsolver

Hillbilly Elegy by J.D. Vance

Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City by Matthew Desmond

 

Poetry

Poems and Prose by Gerard Manly Hopkins

 

Writing/Creativity

Bird by Bird by Ann Lamott

The Knitter’s Book of Yarn by Clara Parkes

Simply Calligraphy by Judy Detrick

 

Cookbooks

Cooking for Jeffrey by Ina Garten

A Kitchen In France by Mimi Thorinsson

Date Night In by Ashley Rodriguez

 

{Books I Read in 2015}
{Books I Read in 2014}

 

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7 Thoughts on “Books I Read in 2016 and Books to Read in 2017

  1. Withharpandvoice on January 2, 2017 at 4:45 pm said:

    This is a great post! You are an avid reader! If I were to read three from this list, what would you recommend?

  2. Oooo, I love finding lists like this! Adding some of the books to my own list. 🙂 xox, Giedre

  3. Larissa D on January 5, 2017 at 6:51 am said:

    Have you read Winter Garden by Kristen Hannah? Like all of her books, strong women, relationship between sisters, mother and daughter. This one takes place in St. Petersburg Russia during the Nazi occupation. Great story.

  4. I’ve heard A LOT about Hannah Coulter, so I’m thinking that would be a good place for me to start since I’ve never read him….I love all these book post’s this time of year but it gives me so.many.ideas for the coming year in my reading 😉

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