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Books I Read in 2015 and Books to Read in 2016

book stack 2015

This year was a good one for books. I enjoyed many across the genres both alone and while reading aloud to the girls. I won’t be doing a round-up of read-alouds {although, perhaps I’ll do a list of favorites} as that would go into the hundreds, but I love glancing over what I’ve read this year and what I would like to read in the coming year. And I would love to hear your recommendations too! {Here’s last year’s post.}

I completed all but one of my books for Modern Mrs. Darcy’s Reading Challenge this year. I’ll include a note next to each book if it was read for that and the category chosen. Following along with the challenge was a great way to expand my interests a bit and be introduced to books I probably never would have come across otherwise. Highly recommend if you’re looking to challenge yourself in the reading department this coming year. {And she’s posted a new one for 2016!} A few friends also followed along and we chatted a bit on Facebook about the books we read each month. It’s even more fun with a group.

Novels

Still Life by Louise Penny {MMD Challenge category: “A book in a genre you don’t typically read”} — Not much for mystery stories, but this author does an amazing job of weaving together the crime and her characters. This is part one of a series. I got my mom hooked {who loves mystery} and she’s read through most of them. I’m adding a couple to this coming year’s reading list.

A God in Ruins by Kate Atkinson — Interesting look at a veteran WWII pilot and his thoughts on the war and modernity.

Rules of Civility by Amor Towles — I really loved this novel which reminded me a lot of The Great Gatsby. I was disappointed to find out that the author is a newbie and doesn’t have anything other than an ebook available. Hopefully, he’ll continue with his talents.

Orphan Train by Christina Baker Kline {MMD Challenge category: “A book your mom loves”} — A seemingly lost piece of American history, the orphan train carried many across the Midwest in the early 1900s. This follows the juxtaposed lives of one such orphan and a modern day orphan when their lives cross. Very interesting read. {more thoughts here}

The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins — A slightly creepy mystery novel that pulls you along from engine to caboose. {more thoughts here}

The Royal We by Heather Cocks — I was hesitant to read this after it was recommended to “British Royal fanatics.” Although I love British culture, I certainly don’t fall into that category. I enjoyed it, nonetheless.

The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion {MMD Challenge category: “A book ‘everyone’ has read but you”} — Silly, quirky characters, but a fun read overall.

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr {{MMD Challenge category: “A book that is currently on the bestseller list”} — This one won a Pulitzer Prize and it is worth reading on repeat. So much beauty and depth to this work.

The Light Between Oceans by M. L. Stedman {MMD Challenge category: “A book you chose because of the cover”} — I loved the descriptions in this book and, of course, was captured by a story which takes place by the sea.

Cannery Row by John Steinbeck {MMD Challenge category: “A book you should have read in high school”} — A great portrait of life on Cannery Row in its heyday.

Parenting/Education

The Highly Intuitive Child by Catherine Crawford — Worth a read if you think you yourself or a loved one is blessed with the gift of intuition.

Your Two Year Old: Terrible or Tender by Louise Bates Ames — Recommended by a friend when I was going through a difficult time relating with my two-year old. This book really helps you “see” inside the mind and feelings of a child this age. I will likely read the one for three year olds too.

The Temperament God Gave Your Kids by Art Bennett — I can see this will be a great resource as my children get older in learning how to relate with each child better in regards their temperament.

The Highly Sensitive Person by Elaine Aron — Sensitivity is often seen as something negative, but this author puts it in a positive light and gives helpful tips on how to use it to your advantage and help your children deal with it when it seems overwhelming.

The Homegrown Preschooler: Teaching Your Kids in the Places They Live by Kathy H. Lee {MMD Challenge category: “A book recommended by someone with great taste”} — Starting to think about schooling with Evey, this book gave some great insight into incorporating it into your every day life at home. {Recommended by Elizabeth Foss.}

Parenting with Grace: The Catholic Parents’ Guide to Raising Almost Perfect Kids by Gregory K. Popcak and Lisa Popcak {still reading…} — Another excellent resource book. The Popcaks do a great job of weaving St. John Paul II’s Theology of the Body into parenting.

Self/Home/Family Improvement

The Life Changing Magic of Tidying-Up by Marie Kondo {MMD Challenge category: “A book originally written in a different language”} — Not a fan. Although, I’m definitely inspired to do some purging and organizing this year.

Daring Greatly by Brene Brown — I cannot recommend Brown’s books enough. Especially for the introverts among us, they inspire you to keep going, even when you feel like breaking, to find hope in disappointments.

The Sinner’s Guide to Natural Family Planning by Simcha Fisher — One I’ve been meaning to read for a while and finally picked up after a sale on the Kindle edition. Worth a read if you are in the trenches of NFP. Fischer writing is humorous, yet inspiring.

Simply Tuesday by Emily P. Freeman {MMD Challenge category: “A book published this year”} — One of my favorites this year. In a world of busyness and hustle, the author reminds us to take a step back and especially pay attention to the small moments of life.

Better Than Before by Gretchen Rubin {MMD Challenge category: “A book by a favorite author”} — Review here.

Witness to Love by Ryan and Mary Rose Verret — Review here.

The Gifts of Imperfection by Brene Brown — Short, but sweet and powerful. More thoughts here.

Design Mom: How to Live with Kids: A Room-By-Room Guide by Gabrielle Blair — Not all that I hoped for, but inspiring nonetheless. Blair gives some great ideas for living stylishly with kids at home. {For more inspiration, check out her blog.}

A Million Little Ways by Emily P. Freeman — An excellent book inspiring creativity in whatever place in life you find yourself.

Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End by Atul Gawande — This one is a must-read. It gives a fantastic look at the current state of modern medicine on the end of life and the real questions we should be asking when considering our own death or those we love.

Memoirs

Delancey by Molly Wizenberg {MMD Challenge category: “A book you’ve been meaning to read”} — Review here.

A Circle of Quiet by Madeleine L’Engle — This was an accidental re-read, but I’m so glad I did. My first encounter was about four years ago when I was pregnant with Evelyn. There is so much more I connected with this time being a “seasoned” mom and more serious writer. Highly recommended.

Cookbooks

Make it Ahead by Ina Garten — I love all of Garten’s cookbooks, as they feature simple and fresh recipes. This newest one is a real gem as it has recipes you can make ahead.

Creativity

Capture the Moment by Sarah Wilkerson — Review here.

Blog, Inc.: Blogging for Profit, Passion, and to Create Community by Joy Cho — For me, this was kind of a flop. I was looking for blogging inspiration, but didn’t find much.

Religion

Laudato Si by Pope Francis — There’s lots to say about the pope’s encyclical and I’m hoping to do a re-read and post or two on it this coming year. Read it, if you haven’t.

The Ancient Path: Old Lessons from the Church Fathers for a New Life Today by John Michael Talbot — Review here.

The Man of Villa Tevere by Pilar Urbino {still reading…} — About halfway through this excellent sketch of St. Josemaria’s life when he was living in Rome. I need to finish it up, stat.

Psychology

So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed by Jon Ronson — Kind of disturbing, but worth considering.

 

reading in the car

Hoping to Read in 2016: 

Novels

Little Women by Louisa May Alcott {last of my MMD challenge for 2015: “A book from childhood”}

Gaudy Night by Dorothy Sayers

In This House of Brede by Rumer Godden

The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah

A Fatal Grace by Louise Penny {Inspector Gamache #2}

The Cruelest Month by Louise Penny {Inspector Gamache #3}

Parenting/Education

The Highly Sensitive Child: Helping Our Children Thrive When the World Overwhelms Them by Elaine Aron

How Children Fail by John Holt

Everyday Sacrament: The Messy Grace of Parenting by Laura Kelly Fanucci

Self/Home/Family Improvement

My Fringe Hours: Discovering a More Creative and Fulfilled Life by Jessica N. Turner

Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear by Elizabeth Gilbert

Rising Strong by Brene Brown

One Thousand Gifts by Ann Voskamp

For the Love: Fighting for Grace in a World of Impossible Standards by Jen Hatmaker

Wild in the Hollow: On Chasing Desire and Finding the Broken Way Home by Amber C. Haines

Open Heart, Open Home: The Hospitable Way to Make Others Feel Welcome and Wanted by Karen Burton Mains

The Art of Memoir by Mary Karr

Memoirs

Something Other Than God by Jennifer Fulweiler

Memoirs of a Happy Failure by Alice Von Hildebrand

Acedia and Me: A Marriage, Monks, and a Writer’s Life by Kathleen Norris

Four Seasons in Rome: On Twins, Insomnia and the Biggest Funeral in the History of the World by Anthony Doerr

Cookbooks

Homemade Decadence by Joy Wilson {Joy the Baker}

Date Night In: More Than 120 Recipes to Nourish Your Relationship by Ashley Rodriguez

The Kitchn Cookbook: Recipes, Kitchens and Tips to Inspire Your Cooking by Sara Kate Gillingham and Faith Durand

My Kitchen Year: 136 Recipes That Saved My Life by Ruth Reichl

Politics/Law

Walkable City: How Downtown Can Save America, One Step at a Time by Jeff Speck

Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson

 

Any others I should add to my list? What were YOUR favorite reads this year?

12 Thoughts on “Books I Read in 2015 and Books to Read in 2016

  1. This is such a great list!!! I forgot to add Laudete Si to my list, it was such a good read! I’m excited to add some of these novels and memiors to my list. Thanks for sharing!!

  2. Wow, look at you!! I am seriously making it a goal next year to watch less TV and read more. I already found a few off your list I want to try. A happy and blessed 2016 to you and your family! 🙂

    • I think that is the only reason I got through so many this past year — I haven’t seen much on TV! 😉 A happy and blessed new year to you and your family too, Bobbi!

  3. I LOVED For the Love…be sure to read her other book 7! Also very good:)

  4. We had a lot of overlap! This makes me 1. want to do my own look back at my year in books 2. read the other things you enjoyed 3. check out more of your to-read list!

  5. Ooh that Ina Garten cookbook sounds great! And I need to read Little Women also – it’s been years!

  6. Thanks for this post, Laurel.I enjoyed it. I’m doing the Modern Day Mrs. Darcy Book Challenge this Year. I just finished my first book, The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry. It was recommended by my mother, a (retired) bookseller. Anyway, I’m going to read The Girl on TheTrain next (not related to the book challenge). My February challenge book will be Shadow Play, a book I previously abandoned about the hidden Catholicness in Shakespeare’s works (nonfiction).

    • You’re quick on the draw to have finished your first book already! 😉
      I’ll have to tell my husband about Shadow Play. He is a huge fan of Shakespeare.

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