'Muff'in Dome

Oh, To Be Understood {If Just By Yourself!}

I’ve always been an information junkie — I like to take in as much information as I can about a particular subject so I can feel that a decision made is well-informed, a subject to be understood is well-researched. The same is true in regards to knowledge of myself and how I relate to other people. I like to learn more about what influences the way I, and others with differing personality types, think and behave. As Anne Bogel states in her new book, Reading People, “I don’t feel boxed in by my personality; instead, understanding myself has taught me how to open the box and step out of it.” It is often easier to navigate the circumstances and events of life when you know what will make you tick or where your strengths lie.

 

Just knowing that I’m an introvert, allows me to be aware that when I’m spending time with an extroverted friend, I might tire out sooner than that person, or that I might need to alert my friend that it might take me a bit more time to make a decision about something, when they are nearly immediately ready to get going on whatever jumps to their attention first. I’m less likely to butt heads with them when I’m aware of these fundamental differences in our personalities.

I live in a household of Highly Sensitive People {or HSPs} of varying degrees, and in different ways, of sensitivity.

“HSPs can be intense. They are passionate by nature, and can make others feel their passion too.”
~ Anne Bogel, Reading People

This, of course, can be a real treat when everyone is over-stimulated! However, knowing this about ourselves is extremely helpful, because when the tell-tale signs of reaching a breaking point begin to rear their ugly heads, we have developed methods of tiptoeing away from the sleeping bear so as not to awaken him. If we did not know this about each other, we would be more likely to fall into the negative attributes that we can tend towards when we become overwhelmed.

These are just a few of the ways that knowing a bit about personality types have been beneficial for me and those I relate to.

I had the privilege recently of reading an advance copy of Anne Bogel’s Reading People, set to release September 19th, which goes into these typing sets and many more. I’ve enjoyed reviewing some of which I’m already familiar with and getting to know about a few more. She gives an excellent overview of each one, recommendations on where to learn more and identify your own of each kind, as well as some great tools for when you get stuck attempting to figure out in which camp you fall within a certain framework. {After misidentifying myself as an INTJ for many years, I’m actually leaning towards INFP/J. Still trying to work this out, but Anne’s tips have me going in the right direction after feeling quite stuck.}

 

I’ve heard some say that these personality frameworks simply allow people to justify their negative behavior. I have known certain individuals to do this, but that is a misuse of them. When used properly as a tool to understand yourself and others better, they can, truly, help you become a better version of you and provide tools for improving your relationship with others, be that with friends, family members, or work colleagues. They are not meant to pigeonhole but rather be tools for formation and growth.

 

Reading People is a great introduction for those unfamiliar with personality typing, as well as for those who would like to dig deeper into them. I guarantee that, with an inquisitive mind, you’ll get to know a bit more about yourself {and maybe even those around you} as you make your way through this book. And it will likely have you thirsting for more!

Grab a pre-order before September 19th and there are some excellent bonuses which you can pick up through the Reading People website with your order number.

 

Disclaimer: I was provided an advance copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own. 

August 2017 Reads

Hey! Look at that. I’m getting my book post up before the end of the first week of the month. We started school this week, so I’m beginning with some good juggling. We’ll see how it all pans out by the end of the month, though…. 😉

 

School Education by Charlotte Mason — The third of the six part series by Charlotte Mason, I’ve become increasingly inspired by her educational method as I read through each one. She goes into depth in this book regarding her motto: “Education is an atmosphere, a discipline, a life.” I really love her emphasis on instilling curiosity and wonder in your children, rather than aiming to teach to a test. Highly recommend this series. {MMD Reading for GROWTH Challenge, 3rd and final of “Three books by the same author”}

The Fringe Hours: Making More Time for You by Jessica Turner — While the message of this book was worthwhile and important {i.e. finding time within the fringes of your day to do the things you enjoy}, it left me more stressed out than inspired. I suppose it could be because I already utilize the “fringe hours” pretty well for accomplishing little tasks here and there, so I finished feeling like I wasn’t accomplishing enough within them {not what I needed}. I also think there is too much of a push to fill every compartment of one’s day with activity, instead of maybe spending five, free minutes letting your mind and body relax. That’s what I need more of.

Which leads to my next two books that are more about slowing down…..

In Praise of Slowness: Challenging the Cult of Speed by Carl Honore — This was a good read, albeit, some of his points could have been more concise {so many examples}. It takes a thorough look at areas of our lives that could use some slowing down. Ones that in this fast-paced world has many suffering from anxiety due to the intense pace we all keep. One thing that really resonated with me: the life of speed keeps us from really connecting with the persons we encounter, especially those closest to us.

Chasing Slow by Erin Loechner — Similar message to the last book, but told in a memoir style. The author relates tales from her life where busy-ness spiraled right out of control, even in the midst of many good things. The irony of her title is that sometimes slow is something you have to pursue with the same intensity as fast. But! Ultimately, one finds more satisfaction there. {MMD Reading for FUN Challenge, “A book with a reputation for being un-put-down-able”}

 

Books I Read to my Children

Mix It Up! by Henri Tullet — My youngest is in love with these books by Henri Tullet. A teacher friend of my mother-in-law introduced her to these recently and she can’t get enough of them. Their interactive nature is right up her alley. If you have a kinesthetic child, these are top-notch for their need to touch.

Chester: the Worldly Pig by Bill Peet — A silly tale of a pig who was too big for his own britches…or is he? This certainly had us laughing at the surprise ending.

John Philip Duck by Patricia Polacco — A duck named after John Philip Sousa? He just might be born for entertaining too! My youngest was in love with this fun story of a young bell boy whose duck made the hotel where he worked world famous. Such great illustrations too.

 

{This post contains affiliate links. By clicking through you do a great service to helping keep the lights on around here. Thank you!} 

What I Learned This Summer

Reflecting on what one has learned over the course of a season is a great way to see the growth in your life. Sometimes the dealings with the daily, blinds us to how much we are learning as the days pass by. I’ve always loved Emily Freeman‘s encouragement to pause a moment and do just that, so, today, I’m linking up with her and others as we look over what the summer has taught us. Join along!

 

1) This summer I learned how to knit a sweater, which involved learning how to swatch and also to hold stitches in order to add on sleeves once the body was done. There was a bit of a hurdle involving ensuring my stitch size on the sleeves was consistent with the body. Switching to double pointed, I was somehow making tighter stitches and it really showed. With a bit of intentional loosening, all was well in the end. I also jumped on the cabling bandwagon and knit my brother a hat just in time for his trip to Scotland and Ireland in June. {Only there would you need a wool hat in June! ;)} Knitting had always been a cooler weather hobby for me, but I’ve really taken to it lately. It seems it may become a year-round endeavor.

 

2) Like most of the nation, so much about solar eclipses! We made an eclipse viewer from a cereal box and punched a tiny hole in a piece of paper to cast shadows on the ground. The crescents made by the sun were so fun to see. I didn’t find out until later that the leaves of trees could create the same effect. It was only about 80% totality here, but it was strange how cool and quiet it became at the time of totality. We might just have to make an effort to go to a place of full totality in 2024.

 

3) Multiple trips to the cabin have afforded us many opportunities for wildflower gathering. I learned together with my girls how to press the flowers. {Now, we must figure out how to use them — likely, we will display them in frames.} After our adventure learning to identify last year, we did a bit of that again and were pleasantly surprised to find many new ones this year. The abundance of snow and rain ensured a myriad of blooms. {A great book for flower identification in our area is The Law’s Field Guide to the Sierra Nevadas — it breaks them down by color, then by petals, making it really easy to decipher.}

 

4) I can do a decent job at cutting my own hair. It needed to be done and I couldn’t find time to get to a salon. So chop, chop, I went, and it doesn’t look too bad. It’s about 2 feet shorter.

 

5) An appreciation for poetry. I was always disinterested in it because the few I knew didn’t connect well with me. I’ve been pushing myself outside my comfort zone, and dabbling in it here and there. One poet I’ve fallen in love with this summer is Mary Oliver. Nearly every time I run across a quote of hers, it cuts me right to the heart. I’m currently enjoying her New and Selected Poems. I think, like most forms of art, different poets strike a chord with us stronger than others. I just needed to explore further to find one that resonated with me.

 

6) The best sunflowers are the volunteers. Despite several attempts to plant new sunflower seeds along the fence as we do every year, the blue jays had the best of me and kept snatching them up. But, never fear! My sunflowers from last year didn’t let me down, because their dropped seeds turned into the most prolific, gorgeous blooms this year. We had sunflower plants that were a good 15 feet tall!

 

7) How to not be afraid of honey bees. A fear of bees always had me running the opposite direction whenever I spotted one. But, then, my eldest and I went out to a lavender field to harvest large bunches of lavender. This cannot be done without a very personal encounter with bees. The man who owned the farm told those of us cutting that if you don’t bother the bees (i.e. don’t cut or touch a flower they are busy upon), they are not going to bother you. I took a deep breath and got to cutting alongside them…and was pleasantly surprised to find that he was right. {The only person who got stung that day was someone who had one fly down her shirt. I guess I can’t blame the bee for that one.}

 

{from Modern Mrs. Darcy’s Instagram}

8) That I’ve misidentified as an INTJ for years; I’m actually an INFP! After reading through an advance copy of Anne Bogel’s Reading People last month, I discovered a tool for determining just which one I was after tests over the past few years suddenly flipped to an INFP identification. I didn’t think it was possible to change, but it is possible to lean towards what you would like to be over which you are.  {More to come on Anne’s book soon!}

 

9) A LOT about Charlotte Mason’s method of education. After an initial exposure to the Charlotte Mason method {mostly through the Wild + Free community}, I gained an interest in learning more and making it a large influence in our homeschool education. I’ve read through three of the six volume set of Mason’s so far and I’m planning to finish the other three soon. One of my favorite quotes: “The duty of parents is to sustain a child’s inner life with ideas as they sustain his body with food.” {from Parents and Children}  Stay tuned: I’m hoping to share more about our homeschool plans for the coming year soon!

 

What did you learn this summer? Link up!

A Golden Birthday for a Three Year Old

When your soon-to-be three year old says that all she wants to do for her birthday is walk on the Golden Gate Bridge, what do you do? Well, you walk that bridge!

She began requesting it in earnest as her birthday “party” after this trip, and only increased her pleadings with gusto, so we loaded up the car on her birthday weekend and made the drive down to the Bay area.

We stayed overnight in San Rafael on Sunday evening {so much more affordable than SF!} and drove down towards the City after the commuter traffic had subsided. It was a smart move driving in right as the parking lots opened at 10 as they quickly filled up within minutes of our arrival. It was also a wise decision to circumvent the weekend traffic — causes a lot less congestion headache!

Lucie jumped from the car, eager to begin the trek! {That pose is all her own.}

Her interest in bridges {and lighthouses} piqued by this book, after being introduced to it over a year ago, has not abated. She still squeals with delight each time she spies one as we pass by. This one is no different and now holds an even more special place in her heart as she walked across it!

We love making these memories with our girls.

And we couldn’t finish off the day without a sweet birthday treat. That banana split was a huge hit! What a goof.

July 2017 Reads

Still in school prep mode as you will see from my list of reads this month {although I did get to one fun novel!}. Back into reading chapter books with the girls too as that fell off a bit the past few months.

 

Teaching From Rest: A Homeschooler’s Guide to Unshakeable Peace by Sarah Mackenzie — I’ve had this on my shelf for a while and was thinking to keep it there for when I hit a time of turbulence in our homeschooling journey. But I’m glad I made the decision to give it a read-through BEFORE we begin. {It’s always better to have a few coping skills in your tool box before you get to a emergency situation and, even better, possibly prevent burn-out from happening altogether.} I love the author’s relatable thoughts on how to plan and schedule your days in the way that is best for YOUR family, but also some thoughts on resting in what you’ve accomplished and not fretting about what could not be done. {MMD Reading for FUN Challenge, “A book you were excited to buy or borrow but haven’t read yet}

A Fall of Marigolds by Susan Meissner — This was an excellent modern novel that ties together the story of two women in the most unexpected way — one living in the modern day, the other in early 20th century, New York City. The consideration of one’s reaction to a catastrophic event is examined in both the characters and leads you to do a little soul-searching of your own.

Reading People: How Seeing the World Through the Lens of Personality Changes Everything by Anne Bogel — I read this as part of the launch team for the book which will be released on September 19th. Anne gives a wonderful introduction into many of the personality tests and how they can be useful in your life. I’m a bit of a personality junkie myself, and have read and tested through a lot of different ones, but I found this helpful too in helping pinpoint ones I was on the fence about and how I could use the knowledge of them more in my life. {If you grab the book on pre-order, there are some amazing freebies up for grabs, including an audio recording by Anne of the book!}

Parents and Children by Charlotte Mason — Second in the six-part series, this one focuses on the role of parents in the education of a child. I think it is worthwhile read even if one sends their children to traditional school. I love how Mason encourages awakening wonder in a child to be the basis of their learning instead of just learning for an examination. This will instill in a child the life-long love of learning and exploring that I truly hope to pass onto mine. {MMD Reading for GROWTH Challenge, 2nd of “Three books by the same author”}

 

Books Read to My Children 

A Boy, a Dog, and a Frog by Mercer Mayer — Wordless, yet highly entertaining. I read this over and over with my youngest who would relate in each picture the story as it progressed. It’s an excellent way to encourage narration in a young child.

The Tale of Despereaux by Kate DiCamillo — This is a beautiful tale of hope and perseverance told through a juxtaposition of the light and darkness of a castle. It is simple and relatable for young children. It’s a wonderful tale to open up conversation about going through a difficult time but not giving up.

Paddington on Top by Michael Bond — We just can’t get enough of this beloved bear. I think this is about number five or six for us in the series. {We were reading in order but now I just go with what I can get my hands on readily as the stories don’t really have a progression.} This one is a great vacation read as there are some high-flying tales of Paddington on a vacation of his own.

 

{This post contains affiliate links. By clicking through you do a great service to helping keep the lights on around here. Thank you!} 

{Linking up with Modern Mrs. Darcy’s Quick Lit this month!}

June 2017 Reads

I nearly forgot about last month’s reading list until I ran across Modern Mrs. Darcy’s Quick Lit this morning. These past few months have nearly been a blur with all the happenings at home {and why it is so quiet around here}, I’ve hardly had time to read. But I did steal a few moments when we were vacationing pre-4th of July weekend! I checked off two of my books for my MMD Reading Challenge, so at least I made some progress there. Both of my reads were good…but vastly different books.

 

Silence by Shusaku Endo — I was hesitant to read this as the subject matter promised to be violent to some degree. But when a few other readers said it was palatable {unlike the film which I don’t think I will be watching}, I decided to give it a try. The story revolves around a missionary priest in Japan who wrestles with another’s apostasy…and the prospect of his own. It is a very good analysis of a crisis of faith in the midst of extraordinary persecution. It certainly makes you think about the strength of your own faith. {MMD Reading for GROWTH Challenge, “A book with an unreliable narrator or ambiguous ending” — I think this book covers both of those!}

Along the Infinite Sea by Beatriz Williams — This is an excellent “beach read” that sweeps you along, making you want to stay up way past ‘lights out’. With a commingling of two women’s lives in the 1960’s, it revolves around a notorious, old car with quite the history. The story flips the reader back to pre-war Europe as the main protagonist navigates a coming-of-age all too quickly. It is one of several in a loose series of stories surrounding the Schulyer family. I read this over several days, and will certainly be looking for another in the series when I need another “beach read”. {MMD Reading for FUN Challenge, “A book set somewhere you’ve never been but would like to visit” (that would be Antibes — yes, please!)}

 

Books Read with My Children

Turtle Splash!: Countdown at the Pond by Cathryn Falwell — This is a fun, short read that my youngest enjoyed as we learned how to count backwards as the turtles jumped into the pond one-by-one.

Time of Wonder by Robert McCloskey — As we began reading this, I thought my girls would lose interest with the heavy text on some pages, but the author magnificently describes the scenes he wants to place his readers in in such a way that they were easily captivated by each page. The illustrations are breathtaking as well.

 Animal Alphabet by Alex A. Lluch — This book is at the girls’ grandparents’ house but is one they pull out every time we are over. Lucie, especially, loves to go through the letters and attempt to name all the animals behind each window before sliding it open. It’s a great way to both learn the alphabet and the names of many animals.

 

{This post contains affiliate links. By clicking through you do a great service to helping keep the lights on around here. Thank you!} 

May 2017 Reads

May was a busy month so my reading time was less than I would have liked it to be, but I got plenty of time in with the girls cuddled up with a good book or two…or dozen. They also followed suit.

 

Home Education by Charlotte Mason — I will be working through the series of Mason’s six books over the next few months. This is the first in the series {which has just been reprinted!}. It was hugely helpful and confirming that our educational philosophy will lean heavily on this over the next few years, at least. I enjoyed her style, but those who haven’t spent much time in philosophical works might find it more tedious to get through. {MMD Reading for GROWTH Challenge, 1st of “Three books by the same author”}

For the Children’s Sake by Susan Schaeffer Macaulay — You will notice a common theme here in both {and only} books I read this month: prepping for next year’s schooling. I sat down and read this in a day. Again, looking at the Charlotte Mason manner of teaching. It is highly accessible and much less intellectual, more practical. I will be returning to this often for inspiration and buoyancy when I’m feeling like I’m floundering.

 

Books Read with My Children

Miss Rumphius by Barbara Cooney — This inspiring read has a wonderful moral my eldest has really taken to heart and is trying to implement with her own sowing of flowers throughout our yard.

Linnea in Monet’s Garden by Christina Bjork — This was a favorite of mine growing up. I attribute it to my lifelong long of Impressionism, and especially Monet’s works. It is also leading my girls to the same, I think. 😉 It’s a lovely tale of a little girl who travels to France with her friend to see Monet’s works and the actual garden in Giverny that inspired many of his paintings. {This little film based on the book is great too.}

Blueberries for Sal by Robert McCloskey — Kerplink, kerplank, kerplunk! You can’t help but be captivated by little Sal and his hunt for blueberries — and the surprise that he encounters along the way. Warning: it will make you want to go out to a patch and pick a bunch of your own.

Little Bear Collection by Else Minarik — A much-loved story book character already, Little Bear, was a huge hit to listen along to as we did a couple long road trips this month. Highly recommend for other little ones who love this sweet bear.

Marin Headlands Adventure

After a short drive across the Golden Gate Bridge, we landed in the Marin Headlands. We had booked a night at the Hi Marin Hostel in one of their private rooms. It was a great fit for our family, with two bunks, one of which had a double on the bottom. The sheets and towels were provided so no extra packing {or laundry}! The annexed house had a communal kitchen, several bathrooms, a dining area, and sitting room, all of which made it feel like a home away from home. Sure, it wasn’t as luxurious as a hotel in the City, but it did the trick wonderfully for us.

We packed in our own meals {which was necessary given the nearest places to grab a bite were in Sausalito, about a 15-20 minute drive away}. I brought along leftovers from the previous night so preparation was super simple. It was very convenient to warm up our meal and eat right away after a long day of travel.

The girls were enamored with the beautiful sunset from our bedroom window as we wound down to go to bed that night. We had a positive experience with the other house guests honoring the quiet hours, and all was settled by 10pm.

Next morning, found us up early and eager to explore after a quick breakfast of yogurt and granola. Rodeo Beach on the Headlands was walkable from the hostel, but we chose to drive over so short legs could save up energy for other exploring that day.

It was a beautiful, peaceful morning with very few others out so early. We discovered a couple mussel shells washed up on the beach and attempted to hear the ocean by placing them to our ears.

Mid-morning found our stomachs grumbling for more grub, so we packed up our things and headed over to Sausalito. A little chocolate shop served coffee and buttery croissants, which was a perfect match for us. We sipped and munched on those, then enjoyed making daisy crowns and slingshots, and running around in the sun.

Lucie was being her usual, goofy self, making all sorts of her signature faces.

sisters in the flowers

We meandered a bit more around town to find a few additions to our lunch spread, including making a stop by the water to look out at the City across the Bay. Evelyn was practicing her photography skills every chance she got. A seagull, surprisingly, posed for her to take some shots.

Our final stop of the day was the Point Bonita Lighthouse. We picked up a Lighthouse Passport back in January when we went to the lighthouse in Pacific Grove. {The girls developed a great interest and love for lighthouses after reading this book.} This one proved a little trickier to grab a stamp for, and it was more harrowing to get to as well. The hours for this particular one are short–just a few, three days a week. We had to stand in line for about 20 minutes for a chance to walk across the narrow suspension bridge and explore. Certainly worth it!

Bye, bye, San Francisco Bay! Until next time!

Monet at the Legion of Honor

A few weeks ago, we headed down to San Francisco for a long weekend to see the special Claude Monet exhibit at the Legion of Honor museum. It was a collection of his early works–many of which I have not seen–so for this Impressionist aficionado, I was over the moon to view them.

The girls enjoyed seeing the collection too, and it was just the right length for shorter attention spans. {Although, Lucie slept through the first half in the Ergo with Steve carrying her. It was a pleasant surprise that she still fit inside!}

We read a bit about Monet together before visiting from one of my favorite childhood books, Linnea in Monet’s Garden. I’m pleased to say that the girls took to Linnea and her adventures in the garden just as I did when I was young.

There was another traveling exhibition that involved random pieces of artwork(?) plopped down in random place inside and outside the museum. That’s Evelyn sitting next to one right out front. She was very entertained by the sculpture pieces, and confused {as we were} about the randomosity of the ones we saw inside. Her questions increased tenfold and my inability to answer did the same.

We ran into our wedding photographer in front of the museum where she was shooting a couples’ engagement photos. We hadn’t seen her since she took our maternity photos when I was pregnant with Evelyn. She does such beautiful work, I wish she lived closer to us so we could have family photos done by her again.

Our trip to SF also included a wonderful picnic on the bleachers that overlook the Bay, and a quick run through Ghirardelli Square with chocolate samples, of course!

One of the little shops on the Square had this tic-tac-toe game created with rocks and washi tape. The girls were in love. We’re searching for suitable flat rocks to make some of our own.

We crossed over the Golden Gate towards the end of the day for more adventures which I’ll share in my next post….

April 2017 Reads

I found myself with my nose stuck in a book more often than not during quiet time in the afternoon this month. {Not so much knitting.} So many good hauls from the library and so many great picks added to our house library {that is going to need a new bookcase soon}.

We inadvertently added in a healthy dose of poetry during this #nationalpoetrymonth. All of us gained a greater appreciation and interest in the flowing verse. We’ll be diving into more this summer.

 

The Magnolia Story by Chip and Joanna Gaines — {MMD Reading for Fun Challenge, “A book you don’t want to admit you’re dying to read”} I picked up this delightful book without having seen an episode of Fixer Upper. The faith, determination, grit, etc. of this couple is incredibly inspiring. Their belief in the providence of God, an even sweeter cherry on top. Many friends of mine rave about this star couple and I can definitely see their appeal. {And, yes, I remedied that lack of Fixer Upper — made my husband sit through an episode a few weeks ago, and I’m definitely hankering to go back for more!}

America’s First Daughter by Stephanie Dray — {MMD Reading for Growth Challenge, “A book that is more than 600 pages”} I am a huge fan of historical fiction. I read a ton of it. But this one maybe my top pick in the genre for the year. It’s certainly in my favorites of the era, maybe second to this one. I never knew much about Patsy Jefferson, but she is one female whose story should be included in school history books. Such a feminist for her time.

The Inspired Room by Melissa Michaels — I’ve been wanting to do some more serious decorating in our home over these past few months so I picked up this book to gain some inspiration. It hasn’t disappointed. Many practical tips for simple fixes that can really liven up a room, as well as balance it.

Upstream by Mary Oliver — After encountering and loving many quotes by this prolific poet in others’ writings, I thought it was high time to pick up one of her own. This book was actually short essays, but made me fall in love with her writing. I will certainly be looking up more of her work in the future. In addition to a few essays on the works of some well-known poets that we quite interesting, what this book mostly contained was thoughts and memories of the author’s forays in nature. It is an excellent pick for reading in a cabin in the woods.

Cut Flower Garden by Erin Benzakein — I’m diving in deep to begin my first patch of cut flowers this year. This book is an amazing inspiration {even if you just desire it for the eye candy of gorgeous blooms sprinkled throughout}. Behind all the beauty though, the author gets down to the nitty gritty of the details of growing each of the varieties she’s experimented with on her own farm for years. I purchased a handful of seed packets from Erin’s farm in Washington as well, and I’m hoping to share glorious results within the next few months!

The Cruelest Month by Louise Penny — Third in the Inspector Gamache series, this one was the most predictable, but that didn’t make it uninteresting. The underlying premise concerning the great inspector that runs through all of the books, came to a deep twist in this episode. {I didn’t purposely time it this way, but it was perfect for the month of April as that is when it takes place, right during Easter.}

Magic of Motherhood by Ashlee Gadd — I’ve been following along with the Coffee + Crumbs blog since its inception, and this lovely collection of essays by the team of main writers was no less touching. I found myself emotionally moved by the feelings shared of mirrored experiences of motherhood. So good.

 

Books Read with My Children

James Herriot’s Treasury for Children by James Herriot — My girls have fallen head over heels for Herriot’s delightful stories of farm animals that he encountered over the years. The personalities of animals can be so funny! I remember reading through many of these as a child myself, and even pulled out an old copy of mine that contains his Cat Stories. Simple and sweet, this is an excellent pick for transitioning into reading chapter books as it is well sprinkled with pictures but longer prose.

A Child’s Garden of Verses by Robert Louis Stevenson — We’ve forayed into the land of poetry as my eldest is developing an interest in rhyming words {even making up her own words just so they rhyme with others she’s said!}. This collection has quick ones that capture the attention of children as they speak of imagination, rhythms of the child’s life, and play.

An Egg is Quiet by Dianna Aston — The artistry of this book is reason alone to own it. From the tiniest ladybug egg to a whopping ostrich shell, this book wonderfully illustrates the incredible beauty and amazing functionality of eggs in many colors and sizes. I learned so much myself! {We also love A Butterfly is Patient, A Seed is Sleepy, and A Nest is Noisy.}

 Easter Parade by Irving Berlin — Based on the text of a song by Irving Berlin, this delightful book was a favorite of my eldest due to the fun, elegant hat made by the young bunny for the Easter parade. 🙂 There are few things better at Eastertide than a lovely Easter bonnet!

 

{This post contains affiliate links. By clicking through you do a great service to helping keep the lights on around here. Thank you!} 

%d bloggers like this: